Glucose Trail to Detect Cancer Early

Glucose Trail to Detect Cancer Early

Scientists have identified a pathway for cancer detection early through the glucose trail that delivers glucose which helps cancer cells grow. The discovery can help in early detection of pancreatic, prostate cancer, breast cancer and colon cancer cells. Scientists from California, Los Angles(UCLA), suggested the use of certain anti-diabetic drugs to reduce the growth of tumors. Cancer cells require high amounts of glucose to survive. So far, passive glucose transporters, known as GLUTS were known as the primary method used by the body to deliver glucose to cancer detection and get treated through cancer hospital.

Study about the Glucose Trail:

However, through an extensive three-year study UCLA scientists have now identified a new mechanism that delivers glucose into pancreatic and prostate cancer cells, helping them to grow and survive, namely active glucose transport mediated by sodium-dependent glucose transporters(SGLTs), “ the researchers said in an article published in American science journal Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences. The prostate cancer can be treated by Ayurveda. The researchers suggest the new pathway through specific radioactive imaging probe along with positron- emission tomography (PET) that can enable an early cancer detection of these cancers cells.

Experts say this is the first promising evidence PET imaging techniques, and SGLT2 inhibitors could be used to diagnose better and treat pancreatic and prostate cancers. The findings also provide strong evidence certain type-2 diabetic drugs, belonging to a new class known as SGLT2 inhibitors which are already approved by the US FDA and recently launched in India, could block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and increase survival in pancreatic and prostate cancers.

Low- cost ‘paper machine’ to detect cancer:

This provides strong evidence that certain type-2 diabetic drugs, belonging to a new class known as SGLT2 inhibitors which are already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and were recently launched in India, could potentially block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and increase survival among pancreatic and prostate cancer patients.

Pancreatic cancer, estimated as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US behind only lung, colon and breast cancer, is also increasing significantly in India. In most cases, the tumor is detected at a very late stage, making it very difficult for doctors to remove it.

New sensor to detect cancer, HIV, hepatitis: Prostate cancer, though more treatable, is also witnessing a rapid increase in incidence in India as well as globally. While globally it is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men, in India.