Automatic Diagnose method for malaria

Malaria is a severe disease of the blood that is caused by the Plasmodium parasite and spread to people through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquito vectors.
Statistics of malaria infected people:

Malaria infected the Half of the world's population. 3.4 billion People in a year are affected from malaria. This leads to about 207 million malaria cases (with an uncertainty range of 135 million to 287 million) and an estimated 627 000 malaria deaths (with an uncertainty range of 473 000 to 789 000). Mostly people of poorest countries are at more risk of malaria. In 2012, 90% of the world’s malaria deaths occurred in Africa and about 460 000 African children died before their fifth birthdays. Increased malaria prevention and control measures are dramatically reducing the malaria burden in many places. Malaria mortality rates have fallen by 42% globally since 2000 and by 49% in the WHO African Region.

Recently it was found that, “Children who live in places where malaria is rampant often suffer repeated bouts of infection with the mosquito-borne parasite but are less likely to become feverish in later episodes of the disease. This happens not because their immune system becomes more adept at protecting them from the parasite but appears to result from certain immune cells being lost and turning dysfunctional.”

Symptoms of Malaria:

Early Symptoms of malaria:

· flu

Common symptoms of malaria

· Fever.

· Chills.

· Headache.

· Sweats.

· Fatigue.

· Nausea and vomiting.

Symptoms may appear in cycles. The time between episodes of fever and other symptoms varies with the specific parasite you are infected with.

Other common symptoms of malaria:

· Dry (non-productive) cough.

· Muscle or back pain or both.

· Enlarged spleen.

· In rare cases, malaria can lead to impaired function of the brain or spinal cord, seizures, or loss of consciousness.

Precaution from Malaria:

· Stay away from dirty and dark places

· Wear protective clothing (long pants and long-sleeved shirts).

· Use insect repellent with DEET (N, N diethylmetatoluamide).

· Use flying-insect spray indoors around sleeping areas. These are most affective reduce malaria.

· Avoid areas where malaria and mosquitoes are present Sleeping under long-lasting insecticidal nets protects against malaria

· Pregnant woman are highly at the risk of malaria. This causes spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, stillbirth and severe maternal anaemia.


Early diagnosis and treatment of malaria is very necessary as it become severe later.  It also contributes to reducing malaria transmission.

Recently, scientist found new method to diagnose malaria. It is computer vision based method. It is same as method used in facial recognition systems combined with visualisation of only the diagnostically most relevant areas.

How it work?

A thin layer of blood smeared on a microscope slide is first digitised. The algorithm analyses more than 50,000 red blood cells per sample and ranks them according to the probability of infection.

Then the programme creates a panel containing images of more than a hundred most likely infected cells and presents that panel to the user. The final diagnosis is done by a health-care professional based on the visualised images.

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