Donate blood, get recognized and earn benefits

Donor health benefits from blood donations

By donating blood, the patients who are already over loaded with iron, they can get relief of toxic accumulation in their bodies. Exclusively for the male blood donors, blood donation can prevent them from heart diseases. However this is a presumptive study, not an established study. The reason may be ‘selection bias’, as the donors are screened thoroughly before drawing blood.

As per the 2012 research study, blood donations can prevent a person from the problems like blood glucose, blood pressure and HbA1c, heart rate for those who have metabolic syndrome, lipoprotein ratio, and imbalanced density (high or low) of lipoprotein.

Why “WHO” World Health Organization is encouraging unpaid volunteers?

During the year 1997, WHO had set a goal for encouraging only the unpaid blood donations.  The “WHO” mission was not supported by many countries because out of 124 countries, only 49 had vouched for this mission. Interestingly, Tanzania, during 2005, had only 20 per cent unpaid volunteer blood donors and the figure shoot massively up to 80 per cent within 2 years that is during 2007. Talking about the participations by countries, as surveyed by WHO, only 68 countries out of 124 countries had come forward for volunteering blood donations.

Paid donations

Most of the plasma apheresis donors are paid in the USA. The price tag is between $25 and $50 per donations. With a view to maintaining adequate blood supply, some of the countries encourage “paid blood supply”. But in contrast, Australia and Brazil discourage blood or any type of human organ or human tissue donations either for money or for in kind.

But almost all the countries recognize and encourage the regular blood donors by awarding felicitating them. The examples are as follows:-

Italy allows paid holiday for the blood donors. Some countries also offer “priorities” to the donors during the crisis time. Some offer assurances and offers first aid kids, free T-shirts, pens, windscreen scrappers and such type of trinkets.

There are some countries who offer some incentives to those who recruit or engage blood donors. In these occasions, donors are handed out prizes and the organisers get rewards for their services.

It is common thing that dedicated donors are recognised. To exemplify it, Singapore donors, who donate certain amount of donations, are awarded by the Singapore Red Cross Society as a drive to commemorate Blood Donor Recruitment Programme. The way they recognize the donors are like this: for 25 blood donations, the award’s name is “Bronze award”.

Malaysia government offers free hospitalization and outpatient benefits. The benefits are this: 3 months of free hospitalization and outpatient benefits for each of the donations made.

Poland government recognises a person as the "Distinguished Honorary Blood Donor”. But there is a condition that is women donating blood should touch the mark of 15 litres and the men should touch the mark of 18 litters. However both of these sexes are given a medal.

The allogeneic blood donors are mostly found to exercise the act of charity. These people never expect any donation related direct benefit. In his book, “The Gift Relationship: From Human Blood to Social Policy, Richard Titmuss, the renowned sociologist had compared between non-commercial and commercial blood donation systems in UK and USA. He of course praised the former. The bestselling book was the eye opener for many in the USA. This resulted to legislation in that country for regulating “privately run blood market”. The book has become a constant reference when any one wants to “mean” blood as a “commodity”.


Many analogous donation programs apply the ideas and principles of this book, published in 1997. To name some of the analogous donation programs: sperm donation and organ donations.

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