"World food day today", be the food for thought for many, who either “donate” OR ”need organ as donations” --Part--10

Continued from Part--9



AIIMS’ initiatives on "ORGAN RETRIEVAL IN MEDICO LEGAL CASES"   is poignant by its workshop on 23rd March 2003, in which various luminaries from all over India, Clinical Experts from different disciplines of Neurology and Neuro Surgery, Cardiology, CTVS, Delhi Hospitals’ Nodal officers, Supreme Court Lawyers, and Delhi Police officials, representing the Crime Branch took part and marked the occasion. The main purpose of the occasion was to smoother the procedure of organ retrieval and develops its guidelines. Forensic experts from across the country were also contributors to the thought.

What is the exact illustration of organ donation?

The exact illustration of organ donation is a person makes wishes during his or her life time with the pledge that after the death his or her body can be harvested for transplantation(s) for helping those patients who are terminally ill. And get a new lease of life.

Legalities of organ donations:

According to the Transplantation of Human Organ Act 1994, only immediate blood relations such as children, parents, sisters and brothers can donate only a kidney and a few other organs.


Organ donations are two types:-


1) Living related donors: This is possible if the donor fulfills the condition as laid by the act.

2) Cadaver organ donor: This is only possible when the person is either dead or brain dead.


What happens to the living body after donation?

A living donor can maintain the body functions with a single kidney, a part of their liver and half of the pancreas. Among these important organs, liver can regenerate itself after donation, but the kidney and the pancreas will remain unchanged.

Tissues and Organs which can be donated:

The major organs & tissues involve:

Heart, lungs, liver, eyes, heart valves, pancreas, kidneys, skin, bones, connective tissues, bone marrow, blood vessels and middle ear.

This proves that any donor can give life to many persons, who are terminally ill and least likely to survive without the organ donation.

“Brain dead” defined

A patient is declared brain dead when his or her impaired brain functions are irreversible and permanently ceases to function. In this condition the “dead brain” cannot send any message to any part of the body for performing vital functions like obeying commands, having the sense of anything and breathing. In this condition a person is kept on ventilation or artificial support for making the organs work in a conditional situation. The moment the ventilation is removed all these organs will stop working. This artificial breathing is necessary for harvesting organs, which are to be transplanted to the living patients who are terminally ill and very much require the donated organs.

The harvesting of the organs must be done within the time frame so that the organs can be healthy and fit for transplantation.   Most of the brain dead conditions are caused by brain tumor, head injuries and some other types of ICU cases.

Brain dead patients, who ultimately donate either by already pledged sense or by family members’ permission, live many years even after their mortal death. Had there been no system of harvesting or transplantations, many lives could not be saved due to non-availability of working organs.



Continued to part--11

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